Oregon Pine


After a bit of research on refurbishing Oregon pine wood it, not knowing much about, i have come to another interesting story with possibly alot of truth. The Anglo-Boer war was manifested by the taxes of transport on Oregon pine being shipped from the United States to South Africa during the late 1800’s and early 1900’s.

Flooring with one coat of varnish and sealer. 

Ramblers rest farmhouse has Oregon flooring, skirting, doors and kitchen counters. It took about 5 days to sand it all down to the raw pinewood. Alot of the original pine has been replaced due to wood borer and rotting due to neglect. The wood has been fumigated, washed, and dried many times. I have hand painted the first coat on the floors and kitchen counters. This is quite a time consuming process as it needs to be done a further 3 times, with light sanding inbetween to get the best sealed finish.

The Douglas-Fir tree is often referred to as Oregon Pine, and possibly gets its name Oregon from the slang name used by older shippies in Canada as Irish Pine :”O’Regan”. It was used quite extensively by the settlers and still used today to make furniture. This is possibly a reason for the name Oregon Pine instead of calling it Douglas Fir ( DF ) wood.

Oregon Pine comes from the floorboards and roofing trusses recovered from houses and buildings constructed in South Africa in the early 1900’s. Oregon imported from Canada and North America was used in this era because a suitable structural timber was required for floors and roofing, and there were insufficient South African indigenous hardwoods, like yellowwood, to meet the demand without destroying our natural forests. Recovered Oregon is hard, durable, seasoned for the decades it was in use and has a lustre and grain that suits the cottage style of furnishing – warm, homely, cozy and with a sense of timelessness.
Sauce

Hallway 

Kitchen counters and doors

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: