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Permaculture


A wwoofing experience. Wake up in the middle of Frontier Country, near Bathurst, Eastern Cape, South Africa. This homestead is 5 metres from one of many game reserves. Its enclosed and has loads of potential for someone wanting to live away from the city life.

It can accommodate one person and two if you pitch a tent outside. It has two small rooms,one with a built in fireplace. A small wash room with a toilet connected to a septic tank and a shower with basin.

It currently has wifi, electricty and water ( non running ). Water is only manually pumped and rain water is a must.

The garden has a chicken coop, small veggie garden and a compost heap.

If you would be interested in wwoofing and living in a fine establishment please contact us or apply on the wwoofing link,


Pronounced hoo-gul-culture, the name of this practice means ‘hill culture’ or ‘hill mound.’

Hugelkulturgardening

This practice makes use of dead branches, leaves and grass clippings by recycling them. To build a hugel bed, you must mound the yard waste, along with any compose, manure or other biomass you’ve got. Then, top the compound with soil and plant your vegetables in it.

One advantage that comes with this method is through the use of wood in the mound. The gradual decay of this wood provides long-term nutrients for plants. By using hardwood, a single mound can supply plants nutrients for over 20 years. The wood also generates heat, which allows for a longer, productive growing season.

hugelkulturgarden

Hugelkultur is a type of raised bed that does a fantastic job at holding moisture, allowing fertility, maximizing space and… well, I guess the list goes on and on!
With this post, learn more about the practice of hugelkultur gardening and the many benefits that come with it.

As longs and branches break down, soil aeration increases, which means that the bed will be no till. The logs also act as sponges, storing rainwater and releasing them during dry times. It’s quite common to never need to water your hugel bed after the first year, unless you live in an especially dry area. Otherwise, regular seasonal rain will provide more than enough water.


Watch Paul Taylor transform a high maintenance lawn, including building a contour dam and swale, into an abundant food-producing system that will produce tons of food annually.

 



For more from George Monbiot, visit http://www.monbiot.com/ and for more on “rewilding” visit http://bit.ly/1hKGemK and/or check out George Monbiot’s book Feral: rewilding the land, the sea and human life: http://amzn.to/1fjgirx

NOTE: There are “elk” pictured in this video when the narrator is referring to “deer.” This is because the narrator is British and the British word for “elk” is “red deer” or “deer” for short. The scientific report this is based on refers to elk so we wanted to be accurate with the truth of the story.

“When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.” – John Muir

When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable “trophic cascade” occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix.

Narration from TED: “For more wonder, rewild the world” by George Monbiot. Watch the full talk, here: http://bit.ly/N3m62h

Visit http://sustainableman.org/ to explore the world of sustainability.

B-Roll Credits:
“Greater Yellowstone Coalition – Wolves” (http://bit.ly/1lK4LaT)
“Wolf Mountain” (http://bit.ly/1hgi6JE)
“Primodial – Yellowstone” (https://vimeo.com/77097538)
“Timelapse: Yellowstone National Park” (http://bit.ly/1kF5axc)
“Yellowstone” (http://bit.ly/1bPI6DM)
“Howling Wolves – Heulende Wölfe” (http://bit.ly/1c2Oidv)
“Fooled by Nature: Beaver Dams” (http://bit.ly/NGgQSU)


 

 

Quite a dry winter with almost no rain in the last few weeks. A couple extra guests on Ramblers I had to make a decision and focus on sealing and renovating the water reservoir next to the workshop. With an extra two hands this took just over 2 days to complete. The following week I will be pumping water from a natural spring about 1km away to fill my reservoir and a couple rain tanks. Problem solved. I hope.

Below is a makeshift water filter using a 2 litre milk bottle, 32mm PVC pipe, a clamp, filled with shade netting and LECA to filter the water as naturally as possible.

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Manage to catch the first leaf that fell onto the shade netting. The system is working!!!!

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I used a central treated old dropper to keep things stable. Added 2 x 5 metres treated pine poles and inbetween used some nylon rope that will keep the shade netting securely down with the high winds that come from the valley. Its had no problems for 3 days. Things are looking good.

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The dogs playing around while I was completing the days work.

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 This organic technique is part of Send a Cow’s training in sustainable agriculture and is a great home garden idea too. Keyhole gardens survive floods and arid conditions well as the raised bed holds moisture and is ‘fed’ grey water and compost via a central basket.

 


www.rainforest-alliance.org

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